Lactation Matters

Resources on Recent Coverage of Neonatal Hypernatremia

The International Lactation Consultant Association (ILCA) has been closely following recent media coverage of neonatal hypernatremia and the role of skilled lactation care providers. We express our deep sympathies to the family impacted in these stories.

ILCA affirms the important role that International Board Certified Lactation Consultants® (IBCLC®s) play as a part of the healthcare team. For those seeking resources on the issues raised, we are sharing the following resources.

Academy of Breastfeeding MedicineOf Goldilocks and Neonatal Hypernatremia

UNICEF UKHypernatremic Dehydration: Response to News Coverage

Baby-Friendly USA – Individualized Care in the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative

Academy of Breastfeeding MedicineClinical Protocol #3: Hospital Guidelines for the Use of Supplementary Feedings in the Healthy Term Breastfed Neonate, Revised 2009

International Lactation Consultant AssociationPosition Paper on the Role and Impact of the IBCLC

We will continue to update this list as additional resources are developed. Do you have a resource you would like to suggest? Please share it with us in the comments.

Women’s Economic Empowerment: The Case for Paid Parental Leave and Support for Breastfeeding

Every day, ILCA is working in public and behind the scenes to promote the role of breastfeeding in transforming world health. 

One critical arena for our work is the Commission on the Status of Women (CSW). The CSW is so important to our work because it is the “the principal global intergovernmental body exclusively dedicated to the promotion of gender equality and the empowerment of women.” 

Their role is to promote women’s rights around the globe. That is why we believe it is critical to elevate breastfeeding, and specifically, paid parental leave to support breastfeeding, at CSW.

The International Lactation Consultant Association  (ILCA) and the World Alliance for Breastfeeding Action (WABA) have released the following statement in support of the sixty-first session of the Commission on the Status of Women at the United Nations Headquarters in New York, USA 13-24 March 2017.

You can read the statement below. You can also find it on the ILCA website in our resources section for future reference.

Breastfeeding provides a strong foundation for the economic empowerment of families throughout the world. In addition to improving maternal and child health, supporting recommended breastfeeding practices could save annually an estimated $302 billion USD globally.

A robust body of evidence demonstrates that breastfeeding contributes to improved maternal and child health, across the life course. Optimal breastfeeding is associated with higher educational attainment and economic productivity of women and girls in adulthood.

A major gap in advancing women’s economic empowerment are policies and practices that also support women’s work as mothers and family caregivers. Perhaps the greatest gap can be found in the lack of adequate support for breastfeeding mothers and infants.

Therefore, the purpose of this statement is to make a case for women’s economic empowerment, specifically through paid parental leave in support of breastfeeding.

The Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action calls upon governments to ensure that legislation, incentives, and appropriate institutional support systems empower women and parents to balance breastfeeding with the demands of women’s labour.

Poverty is a barrier to optimal breastfeeding globally. The Commission on the Status of Women 2016 released a report revealed that among the estimated 43% of people living in severe poverty 70% are women, youth and children. Women and girls living in poverty carry a disproportionate burden of unpaid labour, which in turn leads to poverty across generations. Women in impoverished settings may spend up to 80 hours per week on family care, cooking, cleaning, wood and water fetching, which is the equivalent of two full time jobs. As a result impoverished girls and women are often unable to complete an education and find safe wage-based employment that may lead to improved economic standing for their families and communities. Women and children living in fragile settings are especially vulnerable to the poverty-generating impacts of climate change, forced migration, war, epidemics, and disasters. Suboptimal breastfeeding is also associated with decreased birth spacing, which is a risk factor of both perinatal morbidity and mortality and increased global population growth.

Today’s global economic and labour conditions are changing rapidly, and has led to improvements in women’s participation in local and global economies. However, the benefits of paid labour do not reach all women and families equally. Women continue to participate in labour markets on an unequal basis with men. In 2013, the male employment-to-population ratio stood at 72.2 per cent, while the ratio for females was 47.1 per cent. About 830 million women, mainly in low-income countries, lack social protection for oppressive working conditions. Women in these settings typically have access only to low-paying jobs with poor, and often violent, working conditions. Only 53% of countries meet the International Labour Organisation’s 14-week minimum standard for maternity leave. Together, these factors create insurmountable challenges to mothers breastfeeding as recommended by the World Health Organization and numerous maternal-child health organizations.

Several international conventions and instruments support global maternal- and parental- workplace and breastfeeding empowerment, including The Convention on Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women, the Convention on the Rights of the Child, the Innocenti Declaration on the Protection, Promotion and Support of Breastfeeding, the Global Strategy for Infant and Young Child Feeding and the International Labour Organisation Convention on Maternity Protection.

Women’s economic empowerment is inextricably linked to women’s empowerment as mothers and primary infant caregivers. The needed support includes, but is not limited to, actions that extend access to paid maternity or parental leave, paid breastfeeding breaks, and family friendly environments with flexible, baby-friendly working arrangements. It includes creating social support systems that value women, mothers, breastfeeding, and family care work. Such support systems will only be achieved by inclusion of all members of society, but particularly men, youth, grandparents, childcare providers, employers, and policy makers, in recognizing the importance of women’s economic and maternal empowerment. By creating opportunities for equitable parental and domestic responsibilities, new pathways emerge for building gender equality at the home, the workplace, and society.

When more women work, economies grow. When more mothers breastfeed as recommended, they are healthier, their children are healthier, and their children grow to have healthier children of their own. Healthy children are more likely to survive living in poverty, complete an education, find employment, help lift their families and communities out of poverty, and contribute to long-term national economic growth.

It is, therefore, urgent that breastfeeding advocates, together with women’s health, gender rights advocates, trade unionists, employers and governments, United Nations agencies and others seek collaborative ways to respond.

The World Alliance for Breastfeeding Action and the International Lactation Consultant Association believe that these actions to enhance paid parental leave and support for breastfeeding are essential to making women’s economic empowerment in the changing workforce.

Do you have questions about CSW, ILCA’s global agenda, or the role of paid parental leave on impacting breastfeeding? We want to hear from you! Please leave a comment.

Is Your Baby in Special Care? Best Tips from Lactation Professionals

“If my baby needs special care in the hospital, what do I need to know about breastfeeding?” Parents often approach lactation consultants with questions about breastfeeding/chestfeeding and babies with special needs.

To help celebrate #happyIBCLCday, we asked our members to share some tips and strategies with families.

“I would recommend spending as much time skin-to-skin with baby as long as both mom and babe are medically stable, start pumping/and or hand expressing colostrum within 6 hours of delivery, give any expressed colostrum to the baby, and allow baby to explore mom’s breasts and nipples as tolerated, even if baby is unable to suckle just yet. Give the baby a name and talk to him as much as possible.” -Jenna Gilbert, IBCLC

“That breastmilk is so important for babies with special needs and to continue breastfeeding with least separation from baby that is medically possible. Make sure you get in touch with an IBCLC® for support and start hand expression, as well as pumping, if separated for feeds and establishing your milk supply.” -Angie Hilliard, IBCLC

“The sooner you can contact a lactation consultant in this scenario, the better. The very basic thing all parents need to know—even if baby will not require special care—is the power of skin-to-skin and touch. Parents also need to remember “8 or more in 24” to remind themselves how many times they need to stimulate their breasts to build milk supply during this time.” -Tori LaChapelle Sproat, IBCLC

“Skin-to-skin [as soon as possible] and pumping or hand expression for mom within 6 hours of delivery, if not sooner. Get in touch with the lactation team [as soon as possible].” -Jill Stailey Benner, IBCLC

Find an IBCLC to help with your questions about lactation and employment or your other breastfeeding questions.

Find an IBCLC

What is an IBCLC?

An International Board Certified Lactation Consultant® (IBCLC) is a healthcare professional specializing in the clinical management of breastfeeding and lactation.

An IBCLC is an invaluable asset to breastfeeding families, reassuring you when lactation are going well, and by providing information and support to help prevent and manage common concerns. IBCLCs help with:

  • Prenatal counseling about the factors that may affect breastfeeding, chestfeeding, and lactation
  • Basic position and latch of the infant
  • Information about practices that promote successful lactation
  • Preventing and managing common concerns such as poor latch, inadequate milk transfer or supply, nipple or breast/chest pain, and calming a fussy baby
  • Milk expression and storage for parents who must be separated from their babies
  • Strategies for lactation after returning to work
  • Breastfeeding and lactation in challenging situations, such as feeding twins or triplets, a premature or sick infant, or infants in special medical situations.
Lactation consultants, do you have other tips to share? Families, do you have questions? Share them here!

 

Looking for other ways to celebrate IBCLC day? Click here for all of our #happyIBCLCday images and resources.

Breastfeeding and Employment: Best Tips from Lactation Professionals

“How can I make lactation work with my employment?” Breastfeeding (or chestfeeding) and work questions are some of the most common questions received here at Lactation Matters.

To help celebrate #happyIBCLCday, we asked our members to share some tips  and strategies with families.

“Talking to your employer prenatally is essential! I’ve found in working with parents in a variety of fields from military to office to restaurants that having this conversation while pregnant helps a lot! Give a proposed schedule to your employer and even discuss the business case for breastfeeding if they should have concerns. Some countries provide protections for working parents—that is worth looking up. Lastly, find a lactation consultant and talk about pumping logistics for while you’re at work, hands-on pumping, when to start collecting milk after having baby, and be sure you’re properly fitted for a pump!” – Tori LaChapelle Sproat, IBCLC

“Keep an eye on how many milk removals (breastfeeds plus pumps) you do in a day. Keeping that “Magic Number” steady after you go back to work should prevent a dip in milk production.” – Nancy Morbacher, IBCLC

“Avoid over-feeding when using a bottle, so that the parent can keep up with the baby’s needs when separated.” – Laura Spitzfaden, IBCLC

“If you have a healthy, term baby that is exclusively breastfed, you don’t need to wash pump parts after  every pumping session. The time saved by tossing the parts in a refrigerator and washing them once at the end of the day really adds up—sometimes it even provides enough time to squeeze in a short pumping session.” – Erica Charpentier, IBCLC

“The strategies that work for one type of job might not be ones that work in another industry. In the U.S., there are a number of tools designed both for parents and for local advocates to use to educate, strategize, and build the business case for breastfeeding. Check out this resource that shows common solutions by industry. And here’s a presentation you can use in your own community.” – Cathy Carothers, IBCLC

“Congratulations on your decision to provide your milk to your baby while you go back to work! Working and breastfeeding/chestfeeding parents really have two jobs, which can be particularly exhausting. It’s worth talking with your employer and with HR ahead of time to make a milk-expressing plan. [If you reside in the United States], The Business Case for Breastfeeding is an absolutely brilliant website you can share with your employer explaining how much money they will save by supporting you in pumping for your baby. If your employer has more than 50 employees, they are obligated to provide a private, non-bathroom space with a sink and fridge for you to pump. Explaining how this benefits their bottom line is essential. Your insurance company should provide you with a pump. If you can, attend a La Leche League meeting in your community or visit an online forum for advice on the best pumps for your situation, and to figure out a pumping schedule. If you do have the opportunity to meet with an IBCLC before your baby is born, or while you are on leave (if you have any leave!), she or he can help you plan for expressing your milk while at work, and breastfeeding when you are with your baby. Good luck!” – Betsy Hoffmeister, IBCLC

Find an IBCLC to help with your questions about lactation and employment or your other breastfeeding questions.

Find an IBCLC®

What is an IBCLC?

An International Board Certified Lactation Consultant® (IBCLC) is a healthcare professional specializing in the clinical management of breastfeeding and lactation.

An IBCLC® is an invaluable asset to breastfeeding families, reassuring you when lactation are going well, and by providing information and support to help prevent and manage common concerns. IBCLCs help with:

  • Prenatal counseling about the factors that may affect breastfeeding, chestfeeding, and lactation
  • Basic position and latch of the infant
  • Information about practices that promote successful lactation
  • Preventing and managing common concerns such as poor latch, inadequate milk transfer or supply, nipple or breast/chest pain, and calming a fussy baby
  • Milk expression and storage for parents who must be separated from their babies
  • Strategies for lactation after returning to work
  • Breastfeeding and lactation in challenging situations, such as feeding twins or triplets, a premature or sick infant, or infants in special medical situations.
Lactation consultants, do you have other tips to share? Families, do you have questions? Share them here!

 

Looking for other ways to celebrate IBCLC day? Click here for all of our #happyIBCLCday images and resources.

How Does Birth Impact How I Feed My Baby? Best Tips from Lactation Professionals

“Does our birth experience impact our breastfeeding?” Regardless of how your baby was born, lactation consultants can help you establish the breastfeeding relationship you want.

To help celebrate #happyIBCLCday, we asked our members to share some tips  and strategies with families.

“How you feel about your birth experience can impact your breastfeeding relationship. The method of birth can present some challenges (Caesarean stitches will need to be worked around) but these do not compare to a parent who has felt that they were a passenger in their own medical care. It can be hard to connect when you’re experiencing these emotions. The good news is that these do not make breastfeeding impossible! If you have questions, help exists. Your goals matter and you deserve to be heard—especially with your breastfeeding journey!” -Tori LaChapelle Sproat

“Absolutely! Our birth experience can have drastic implications on our breastfeeding journey. The most important thing is to advocate for your baby and yourself. Do you need access to a breast pump? Ask for one. Do skin-to-skin as much as possible. Ask for help if you need it or just aren’t sure if things are going well. I also feel it is important to talk about your experience. What happened during your delivery? Find someone you can talk to. Maybe even journal your experience. It is so important to work through the emotions surrounding the memories of our birth experiences, good or bad. Breastfeeding can help you heal if you didn’t get the birth you desired. It provides you and your baby with a beautiful bonding experience that simply cannot be replicated.” -Jennifer Passwaters, IBCLC

“As a midwife, I often get questions about the benefits of delayed cord clamping. The evidence tells us that allowing the cord to pulse naturally gives the baby iron stores that can offset the risk of iron deficiencies in infancy.” – Sarah Davis, LM, IBCLC

“Pretty much all babies are born to breastfeed, no matter how they choose to be born! In my area, all hospitals deposit babies directly onto the parent’s chest immediately after birth. This facilitates early breastfeeding and bonding, even after a c-section. I think it’s important to know that having lots of IV fluids can impact breastfeeding in a few ways.First, it can make babies “extra juicy.” Babies may be born at up to 6% heavier than their expected birth weight, which they lose really rapidly in their first 48 hours. It can look like they are losing a dangerous amount of weight! So it’s important to evaluate in the context of whether baby is eating, peeing, and pooping well. Second, extra IV fluids may cause extra swelling in the feet, legs, hands—and breasts! Swelling, or edema, can make nipples appear flat and can make breasts very hard and uncomfortable. A shortcut is to use a nipple shield, which can be very helpful. But, there are manual tricks for moving fluid out of the breast which is way better for the parent and baby in the long run.

I think it’s very helpful to know that a very prolonged labor can cause a delay in mature milk “coming in” by a day or two, and a c-section can also delay milk coming in by a day or two. In this case, consult with an IBCLC® on how to manage feeding the baby while waiting for the milk to come in. Keeping the baby wrapped next to your skin, with his bare face on your bare chest, as much as possible, may be the single most useful thing you can do to help your milk come in and help your baby learn to breastfeed. And most of all, ask for help from an IBCLC® in the hospital, from your midwife, or from a community-based IBCLC®!” – Betsy Hoffmeister, IBCLC

Find an IBCLC to help with your questions about lactation and employment or your other breastfeeding questions.

Find an IBCLC

What is an IBCLC?

An International Board Certified Lactation Consultant® (IBCLC) is a healthcare professional specializing in the clinical management of breastfeeding and lactation.

An IBCLC is an invaluable asset to breastfeeding families, reassuring you when lactation are going well, and by providing information and support to help prevent and manage common concerns. IBCLCs help with:

  • Prenatal counseling about the factors that may affect breastfeeding, chestfeeding, and lactation
  • Basic position and latch of the infant
  • Information about practices that promote successful lactation
  • Preventing and managing common concerns such as poor latch, inadequate milk transfer or supply, nipple or breast/chest pain, and calming a fussy baby
  • Milk expression and storage for parents who must be separated from their babies
  • Strategies for lactation after returning to work
  • Breastfeeding and lactation in challenging situations, such as feeding twins or triplets, a premature or sick infant, or infants in special medical situations.
Lactation consultants, do you have other tips to share? Families, do you have questions? Share them here!

 

Looking for other ways to celebrate IBCLC day? Click here for all of our #happyIBCLCday images and resources.

When Should Families Get Help From a Lactation Consultant?

 

“When should I consult with an IBCLC?” Knowing when to ask for assistance is a common question faced by breastfeeding/chestfeeding families.

To help celebrate #happyIBCLCday, we asked our members to share some tips  and strategies with families.

“If you perceive a problem and your corrective action isn’t making an improvement within 48 hours.” -Brenda Dalton, IBCLC

“Anytime you have a question or concern related to breastfeeding: before pregnancy, during pregnancy, anytime after baby is born, if you are considering surrogacy/adopting, you have friends or family members or co-workers who are breastfeeding. Even (especially) if you are a healthcare worker or involved in care of children and parents and want to be helpful, encouraging, and supportive.” -Phyllis Kombol, IBCLC

“Call us any time you have questions! . . . Google and Facebook groups can be helpful, but many times overwhelming. Call an IBCLC® with your questions – we love what we do and are happy to answer the call. If you’re needing more detailed advice (continuing pain, weight loss concerns, supply concerns) then please find an IBCLC® and be seen in person! [The] visit will save you hours of internet browsing and help empower you in your breastfeeding journey!” -Tori LaChapelle Sproat, IBCLC

“Most basic breastfeeding/chestfeeding questions can be answered by community support from [peer-to-peer lactation support groups] and [peer counselors] . . .It is wonderfully comforting to hire an IBCLC® even for simple challenges—because it’s so lovely to have a compassionate care provider sit with you and answer all your questions for a few hours! If your insurance covers it or if you have the resources, it’s definitely worth meeting with an IBCLC® prior to the birth of your baby for a breastfeeding class. It’s even a nice idea to hire an IBCLC® just to make sure everything is going well.” – Betsy Hoffmeister, IBCLC

Find an IBCLC to help with your questions about lactation and employment or your other breastfeeding questions.

Find an IBCLC

What is an IBCLC?

An International Board Certified Lactation Consultant® (IBCLC) is a healthcare professional specializing in the clinical management of breastfeeding and lactation.

An IBCLC is an invaluable asset to breastfeeding families, reassuring you when lactation are going well, and by providing information and support to help prevent and manage common concerns. IBCLCs help with:

  • Prenatal counseling about the factors that may affect breastfeeding, chestfeeding, and lactation
  • Basic position and latch of the infant
  • Information about practices that promote successful lactation
  • Preventing and managing common concerns such as poor latch, inadequate milk transfer or supply, nipple or breast/chest pain, and calming a fussy baby
  • Milk expression and storage for parents who must be separated from their babies
  • Strategies for lactation after returning to work
  • Breastfeeding and lactation in challenging situations, such as feeding twins or triplets, a premature or sick infant, or infants in special medical situations.
Lactation consultants, do you have other tips to share? Families, do you have questions? Share them here!

 

Looking for other ways to celebrate IBCLC day? Click here for all of our #happyIBCLCday images and resources.

Preparing to Breastfeed: Best Tips from Lactation Professionals

“How should I prepare for breastfeeding before my baby arrives?” Helping families get ready for breastfeeding/chestfeeding is a common role for lactation consultants.

To help celebrate #happyIBCLCday, we asked our members to share some tips  and strategies with families.

“ . . . Go and see and be around other nursing mothers, make connections with other families and support people during pregnancy. . .Talk to your partner about what breastfeeding means to you and what you think might be helpful from them (and not). Often the partner (if one is involved) says or does things that hurt the breastfeeding person without realizing it. In my class, we practice how the partner can share and show love and concern by asking what the mom needs in that moment (vs. giving advice or dismissive comments).” -Roxanna Farnsworth, IBCLC

“Ask about your hospital or birth center’s policy on skin-to-skin and the . . .  hours [immediately] after birth. Plan for uninterrupted skin-to-skin and breastfeeding for a minimum of 1-2 hours or longer if needed. Prepare your family that you will be limiting visitors during this time.” -Chasta Carson Hite, IBCLC

“My advice? Take a prenatal breastfeeding class, and set up a prenatal education consult with an IBCLC if you can. Learn & practice hand expression, so you can get good at it by the time you need it- it is really beneficial!” -Bryna Sampey, IBCLC

“Watch others breastfeed, ask lots of questions.” -Claire Clark, IBCLC

“Focus on learning about what normal newborn breastfeeding behaviors are! They are very different from that beautiful 5-month-old you may have seen breastfeeding . . .” -Lynette Beard, IBCLC

“Surround yourself with support (find your village) and join [a peer-to-peer breastfeeding support group].” -Maria Ryan, IBCLC

“Do your homework, join [a peer-to-peer lactation support group] and make contact with your local group. Mothering is jolly hard work . . . not the breastfeeding! The first 6 weeks are the hardest. There is heaps of help and support out there. Know where it is.” -Ellen Prendergast, IBCLC

“Determination is key and having a positive influence for support on your journey. [Take a] breastfeeding prenatal class prior to delivery. [Contact] a lactation consultant in hospital when needed. Having contact information of a lactation consultant and breastfeeding support in your community to support your personal breastfeeding goals so that you can have your best experience possible!” -Angie Hilliard, IBCLC

Find an IBCLC to help with your questions about lactation and employment or your other breastfeeding questions.

Find an IBCLC

What is an IBCLC?

An International Board Certified Lactation Consultant® (IBCLC) is a healthcare professional specializing in the clinical management of breastfeeding and lactation.

An IBCLC® is an invaluable asset to breastfeeding families, reassuring you when lactation are going well, and by providing information and support to help prevent and manage common concerns. IBCLCs help with:

  • Prenatal counseling about the factors that may affect breastfeeding, chestfeeding, and lactation
  • Basic position and latch of the infant
  • Information about practices that promote successful lactation
  • Preventing and managing common concerns such as poor latch, inadequate milk transfer or supply, nipple or breast/chest pain, and calming a fussy baby
  • Milk expression and storage for parents who must be separated from their babies
  • Strategies for lactation after returning to work
  • Breastfeeding and lactation in challenging situations, such as feeding twins or triplets, a premature or sick infant, or infants in special medical situations.
Lactation consultants, do you have other tips to share? Families, do you have questions? Share them here!

 

Looking for other ways to celebrate IBCLC day? Click here for all of our #happyIBCLCday images and resources.

2017 JHL New Features: Lactation Newsmakers and About Research

Following a year of “listening and learning,” Journal of Human Lactation (JHL) Editor in Chief, Joan E. Dodgson, PhD, MPH, RN, FAAN has made new additions to JHL, with the goal of providing content that best meets the needs of the JHL’s reader community.

Two new feature columns, Lactation Newsmakers and About Research, will appear in each new issue of JHL.

The Lactation Newsmakers column will present interviews with individuals doing exemplary work worldwide, promoting and supporting breastfeeding. In addition to highlighting the wealth of knowledge and experience in the larger community of lactation professionals, JHL hopes this column will help stimulate new ideas and projects in local communities and/or agencies.

ILCA members can use their free JHL access to read the first interview, conducted by Dr. Kathleen Marinelli (JHL Associate Editor) with Dr. Cesar Victoro of Brazil, a global leader in promoting and protecting breastfeeding in ways that affect clinical practice daily.

The About Research column was added in direct response to needs expressed by the JHL reader community, many of whom are not researchers. The feature is designed to foster greater understanding of the specific types of research published in the journal. It will highlight the diversity of research methods in the field of lactation research and its various disciplines, while providing information about how to determine scientific rigor and quality in the research process, written specifically to address the needs of non-researchers.

For example, the February edition of JHL features four literature reviews, each with slightly different methodologies. The About Research column “focuses on various types of literature reviews and what constitutes rigor and quality in each,” as described by Dodgson in her editorial What’s New This Year? ILCA members can access this editorial, the literature reviews and the About Research column HERE.

Have questions about how to access this or other ILCA members benefits? Click here to access all your benefits in one place, plus get your questions answered with FAQs and tech support.

Not an ILCA member? You can still access JHL by visiting the JHL homepage for article abstracts and subscription information.

2017 IBCLC Care Award Applications: Now Open

Let potential clients know that your Hospital-Based Facility or Community-Based Agency recognizes the role of the International Board Certified Lactation Consultant® (IBCLC®) in protecting, promoting, and supporting breastfeeding by applying for the IBCLC Care Award.

The IBCLC Care Awards are promoted  to new families and the general public, which means your facility can enjoy the benefits of positive public relations in your community, including:

  • Enhanced attractiveness to potential patients
  • Competitive edge in recruiting lactation consultants, nurses, midwives, mother support counselors, and other medical staff
  • General goodwill in the community by providing excellent care in helping new families reach their breastfeeding goals

Visit the IBCLC Care Directory to see which Hospital-Based Facilities are already benefiting from the IBCLC Care Award program!

Hospital-Based Facilities and Community-Based Health Agencies that staff currently certified IBCLCs can apply online to become a recognized IBCLC Care Award facility. Learn more about the qualifications, and complete the online application here.

Applications will be accepted through 17 February 2017.

The award was created by International Board of Lactation Consultant Examiners® (IBLCE®) and International Lactation Consultant Association® (ILCA®). Learn more and apply here.

ILCA Global Collaboration Committee: Bridging and Linking for Global Lactation Outcomes


Around the globe, communities are developing and implementing strategies that are impacting breastfeeding outcomes. If these efforts—and those of the international lactation advocacy community—were linked together, the result could be much more powerful than the sum of its parts. The ILCA Global Collaboration Committee was created out of the belief that collaboration is essential to achieving our goals, and that cross-cultural awareness, openness, and engagement are essential elements to those efforts.

This new Advisory Committee, created by the ILCA Board of Directors, will work toward breaking down barriers to global collaboration—including US centrism—and identify opportunities to support bridging and linking between the powerful work happening around the world.

The committee will be responsible for overseeing the execution of ILCA’s global collaboration strategies. The committee will serve as a network responsible for recommending strategies for ILCA to support regional efforts and the global lactation community. Additionally, the committee will become the focal point for overseeing and expanding the Global Partner Program, presently including 21 Global Partners.

An executive team, comprised of representatives from each of the six WHO-like regional teams, will be responsible for fostering collaboration among the global activities of each of the regional teams. This streamlined structure helps avoid siloing of global activities while expanding our capacity and capability to focus global collaboration activities. Another important advantage is the potential for expanding our sensitivity, awareness, and efforts toward geographic diversity.

Candidates from around the globe, who are alert to regional and cross-cultural differences as they occur within the global breastfeeding community, are being sought for this important effort. If you are interested in representing your region in forging a new path for global collaboration within the global lactation community, you are encouraged to visit here to review the Global Collaboration Committee Profile and to complete an ILCA Volunteer Application.

Introducing the New ILCA Style Guidelines for Written Professional Resources

Breast milk or human milk? Skin-to-skin or skin to skin? To guide the International Lactation Consultant Association® (ILCA®) in its usage of common terms in our profession, ILCA’s Professional Resources Committee originally developed the ILCA Style Guidelines for Written Professional Resources in 2015. This document was produced to guide the development of ILCA’s professional materials (though others in the field of lactation may wish to adopt the Preferred Usage section for their written materials). These guidelines have recently undergone an update, including a change in the preferred style guide and efforts to better align with ILCA’s Core Values of Diversity and Equity.

Style Guide Conversion

Among the changes that Joan E. Dodgson, PhD, MPH, RN, FAAN made when she took on the mantel of Editor-in-Chief at the Journal of Human Lactation (JHL) was a broadening of the journal’s content to address humanities and social science research in addition to health science research. With that expansion came a change in the JHL style guidelines from the American Medical Association (AMA) Manual of Style to the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (APA), Sixth Edition.

The International Lactation Consultant Association® (ILCA®) also made the decision to convert its style guidelines from AMA format to APA format. But that is not the only change to ILCA’s style standards.

Aligning with ILCA’s Core Values of Diversity and Equity

The new ILCA Style Guidelines for Written Professional Resources is now a dynamic document that will be updated periodically as part of ILCA’s implementation of the Strategic Map. This implementation includes increasingly manifesting our Core Values of Diversity and Equity. Valuing diversity here at ILCA means that “we foster an inclusive environment that supports leadership, advocacy, professional development, and research from varied perspectives.” And valuing equity means that “we support global access to skilled lactation care and the IBCLC profession.”

As an international organization, our members, colleagues, and Global Partners represent a variety of social groups, countries, and languages, including different versions of English. As English is the primary language used for ILCA publications, this update of the ILCA Style Guidelines for Written Professional Resources addresses the different spelling of words that are specific to British English versus U.S. English:

When sole authors submit a document for publication by ILCA, their use of spellings specific to either British English or U.S. English will be maintained. Prior to jointly submitting a co-authored document for publication by ILCA, co-authors must gain consensus on whether spellings specific to either British English or U.S. English will be used; their consensus will be maintained when the document is published by ILCA.

And, in recognition of the diversity in gender identity around the world, this style update also begins incorporating gender inclusive language. The vast majority of lactation-related literature refers to mothers breastfeeding, without using language which acknowledges that transgender fathers and genderqueer parents may breastfeed, chestfeed, or lactate. As Alice Farrow stated in their JHL article Lactation Support in the LGBTQ Community, “Cisnormativity is manifested in institutional erasure and practices that ‘exclude or ignore the possibility of providing service to trans clients, such as the predominant use, within the lactation profession, of female gendered language when referring to breastfeeding parents.” So, the ILCA Style Guidelines for Written Professional Resources seeks to end this erasure in ILCA publications by including Preferred Usage entries such as:

breastfeeding (not “nursing,” when referring solely to a breastfeeding mother or a parent of any gender who prefers this term)

breastfeeding/chestfeeding (preferred over “breastfeeding” when referring to parents of any gender directly feeding at the breast/chest)

breast milk (two words); use of “human milk” is preferred; “mother’s own milk,” “father’s own milk,” “parent’s own milk,” or “expressed milk” may be used

chestfeeding (not chest-feeding)

father (not an informal alternative such as “dad,” “da,” or “papa”)

father–infant or father–infant dyad, with a dash (not “father–baby”)

The new ILCA Style Guidelines for Written Professional Resources are the result of collaborative editing by Kathleen Marinelli, ILCA Director, Cynthia Good Mojab, ILCA Education Manager, and Brit Stamey, Client Manager and Senior Copy Editor with J&J Editorial, LLC. Review was provided by the ILCA Professional Development Committee and the Equity Committee. The ILCA Board of Directors approved the guidelines in December 2016. As we increasingly address issues of diversity and equity in all that we do, we welcome your feedback.

Top 10 JHL Posts

On topics ranging from the impact of perinatal mood disorders to lactation duration to therapeutic breast massage to substance use and breastfeeding, our community tapped into the top-accessed resources of Journal of Human Lactation (JHL) more than 23,000 times last year.

As we wrap up 2016, we compiled this list of the year’s top ten most accessed JHL content. Planning on using research to guide your practice next year? Now is the time to join or renew your membership to ensure a full year’s access to next year’s new content. Once you join or renew, you will also have online,on-demand searchable access to the full database of JHL research to find the evidence you need.

#10 Breastfeeding among Mothers on Opioid Maintenance Treatment: A Literature Review

Lillian C. Tsai, RN, MS, IBCLC and Therese Jung DoanRN, PhD

#9 Labor Epidural Analgesia and Breastfeeding: A Systematic Review

Cynthia A. French, MS, PhD, CRNA; Xiaomei Cong, PhD, RN; and Keun Sam Chung, MD

#8 Transfer of Methamphetamine (MA) into Breast Milk and Urine of Postpartum Women who Smoked MA Tablets during Pregnancy: Implications for Initiation of Breastfeeding

Chulathida Chomchai, MD; Summon Chomchai, MD, MPH; and Ratchada Kitsommart, MD

#7 Domperidone for Treatment of Low Milk Supply in Breast Pump-Dependent Mothers of Hospitalized Premature Infants: A Clinical Protocol

Barbara Haase, APRN, MSN, CPNP, IBCLC; Sarah N. Taylor, MD, MSCR; Jill Mauldin, MD; Teresa S. Johnson, PhD, RN; and Carol L. Wagner, MD

#6 New Beginnings: Changed (Us) for Good

Kathleen A. Marinelli, MD, IBCLC, FABM and Sara L. Gill, PhD, RN, IBCLC, FAAN

#5 Breastfeeding Duration and Primary Reasons for Breastfeeding Cessation among Women with Postpartum Depressive Symptoms

Erin McElderry Bascom, MPH and Melissa A. Napolitano, PhD

#4 Breastfeeding Self-efficacy: A Critical Review of Available Instruments

Kathleen A. Marinelli, MD, IBCLC, FABM; Sara L. Gill, PhD, RN, IBCLC, FAAN; Emily L. Tuthill, MS, RN; Jacqueline M. McGrath, PhD, RN, FNAP, FAAN; Melanie Graber; Regina M. Cusson, PhD, NNP-BC, PRN, FAAN; and Sera L. Young, MA, PhD

#3 Weighing the Facts: A Systematic Review of Expected Patterns of Weight Loss in Full-Term, Breastfed Infants

Kathleen A. Marinelli, MD, IBCLC, FABM; Sara L. Gill, PhD, RN, IBCLC, FAAN; and Diane Thulier, PhD, RN

#2 Suck-Swallow-Breathe Dynamics in Breastfed Infants

Vanessa S. Sakalidis, BHlth Sc (Hons), PhD, Donna T. Geddes, DMU, Post Grad Dip (Sc), PhD

#1 Therapeutic Breast Massage in Lactation for the Management of Engorgement, Plugged Ducts, and Mastitis

Kathleen A. Marinelli, MD, IBCLC, FABM; Sara L. Gill, PhD, RN, IBCLC, FAAN; Ann M. Witt, MD, IBCLC; Maya Bolman, BA, BSN, IBCLC; Sheila Kredit; and Anne Vanic, MSN, CPNP, IBCLC

Top 10 Things to Do in Toronto #ILCA17

This year’s International Lactation Consultant Association® (ILCA®) annual conference—Knowledge, Diversity, Equity: Global Access to Skilled Lactation Carewill be held 19-22 July 2017 at the Sheraton Centre Toronto Hotel & Towers in Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

While you are enjoying the speakers and connecting with the ILCA community, we know you will also want to take time to explore all that Toronto has to offer.

We’ve assembled a list of some of the top attractions in Toronto. We hope you will share with us in the comments some of your favorite things to do in the area.

  • St. Lawrence Market: Part farmer’s market, part artisan fair, part cultural exhibition space, part office building, the St. Lawrence Market is a must-see for any Toronto visitor.
  • Casa Loma: A castle? In Toronto? Yes! This European-style castle and former home of Canadian financier Sir Henry Pellatt is complete with decorated suites, secret passages, an 800-foot tunnel, towers, stables, and beautiful five-acre estate gardens.
  • Royal Ontario Museum: This family-friendly art and natural history museum has a diverse collection unlike any place else. Paintings, sculpture, glass works, folk art, and textiles on the one hand; dinosaurs, Cenozoic mammals, rocks and minerals, and mummies on the other.
  • CN Tower: Listed as one of the Seven Wonders of the Modern World, the CN Tower offers awe-inspiring engineering and one amazing view. See Toronto from on high, or make an evening of it and dine at the Tower’s famous 360 Restaurant—1150 feet above the city.
  • Toronto Islands: Slip away from the city for bit and take a ferry out to one or more of the Toronto Islands, a short ride from the city center. The islands are a great place for a family picnic, amusement park rides, lounging on the beach, or renting a kayak or bicycle for more exploring.
  • Distillery DistrictWander the historic Distillery District. Once the home of Canada’s largest distiller, this pedestrian-only neighborhood is a blend of old and new. Victorian buildings and carriage roads are the setting for contemporary cafes, art galleries, and performance spaces.
  • Ripley’s Aquarium of Canada135,000 square-feet, more than 1.5 million gallons of water, 16,000 aquatic animals, 100 species of fish—right downtown.
  • Harbourfront Centre: A 10-acre public trust born of a former warehouse district, now a thriving neighborhood and cultural hub along the shore of Lake Ontario.
  • Ontario Science Centre: About 8 miles from downtown, children and adults can explore hundreds of educational exhibits related to science and technology. The facility also includes a planetarium and IMAX theater.
  • Hockey Hall of FameWe HAD to include it! A museum and entertainment destination like no other, a trip to Toronto is not complete without at least a small dose of this iconic sport. Just think what your friends will say when you tell them you’ve seen the original Stanley Cup!

We can’t wait to share with you all Toronto has to offer at #ILCA17!

National—Regional Partner Update: Chinese Lactation Consultant Association (CLCA)

The International Lactation Consultant Association® (ILCA®) Global Partners Initiative was designed to improve breastfeeding worldwide by creating linkages between organizations around the globe. ILCA would like to welcome its 21st National—Regional Partner, Chinese Lactation Consultant Association (CLCA), a professional organization that provides education and support, as well as continued certification, for lactation consultants in China. 

We asked Dr. Shu-Fang Wang, PhD, RN, CNM, IBCLC, CBD, the president and founder of CLCA, to share with us more about the role of the organization in breastfeeding support and why they decided to sign on to the Partners Initiative. Dr. Wang shared her answers with us, as well as the Chinese-language translation of our interview.

Lactation Matters (LM): Tell us about why your organization is so important to human health in Taiwan and other Chinese speaking regions.

請談一下為什麼華人泌乳顧問協會對台灣及其他華人是非常重要的?

CLCA is established, 5 July 2015

Dr. Shu-Fang Wang (SFW): Breastfeeding has been advocated in Taiwan for many years, but the breastfeeding rate has still not reached the World Health Organization (WHO) goal, despite our efforts. Part of reason is that International Board Certified Lactation Consultants (IBCLCs) do not have full recognition by the medical professionals or the general public in Taiwan. Now, people do know the importance of breastfeeding and prefer breastfeeding over bottle-feeding for their babies. But without continuing professional support, the road to continued breastfeeding is full of obstacles. When they encounter problems, mothers today seek help through the Internet. The information about breastfeeding and lactation on the web is full of misconceptions. There are also so called “lactation dredgers 通乳師” who have no formal training nor basic knowledge of lactation, but claim to be able to help breastfeeding mothers by resolving blockages. Because of the great need for breastfeeding support, all kinds of unusual practices have started to appear in Taiwan. Similar phenomena can be seen in China and other Chinese-speaking regions. Some people simply do not know to seek IBCLCs for help, or, because the wait list is too long, they turn to non-professionals for assistance.

In view of the needs to protect, promote, and support breastfeeding, in July of 2015, a group of lactation consults in Taiwan founded the Chinese Lactation Consultant Association (CLCA), which is based in Taiwan. CLCA strives to promote the recognition, professional development, and advancement of IBCLCs in Taiwan and in other Chinese-speaking countries. We hope that through this process, a breastfeeding-friendly environment or culture can be established, so that the breastfeeding families can better enjoy the breastfeeding experiences.

母乳哺育在台灣推行已有多年,但在種種努力下,母乳哺育率仍然無法達到世界衛生組織的目標。其中一個原因是因為國際認證泌乳顧問(IBCLCs)在台灣的醫療界或者社會大眾中沒有得到該有的認可。現在人們知道母乳的重要性,也會選擇母乳哺餵而不瓶餵他們的寶寶。但是,沒有專業的支持,持續哺乳的路很難走下去。當遇到問題時,現在的母親都會上網尋求協助。而網路上有關母乳哺餵或泌乳的資訊很多錯誤訊息。再者,社會上還有些所謂的「通乳師」,沒有專業訓練,沒有泌乳相關知識。因為社會上的需求很大,所以種種亂象就產生。類似的情況也發生在中國及其他說中文的地區。有些人甚至不知道要找國際認證的泌乳顧問,又或者因為要等太久,轉而去找不專業的人協助。2015年7月一群專業泌乳顧問工作者秉持「營造母乳哺育友善社會,促進泌乳家庭享受親密哺育經驗」在台灣成立了 華人泌乳顧問協會(CLCA),期許能保護、推廣、及支持母乳哺育。

 

LM: What challenges do you face in your work?

你們的工作面臨那一些挑戰?

(SFW): The healthcare system in Taiwan is mostly medically oriented. The lactation consultant is not recognized as a part of the healthcare team currently. This is part of CLCA’s mission, to broaden the acknowledgement and acceptance of IBCLCs as the experts on breastfeeding and lactation in public and private sectors.

Furthermore, there are many myths and misconceptions about lactation/breastfeeding in the Chinese-speaking cultures, and this creates confusion and problems for mothers who want to continue breastfeeding. Through various education and training programs, seminars, and meetings, CLCA supports not only IBCLCs, but other healthcare workers and people concerned with breastfeeding and human lactation, so that they have the “right” knowledge to help breastfeeding mothers. In the process, we hope to foster awareness of the important roles of IBCLCs in the society in general.

The population of ethnic Chinese people is near 14.3 billion. This includes the 1385 million people in mainland China and the 50 million ethnic Chinese people overseas. This comprises approximately 19.2 percent of the global population, which means one in every five people speaks Chinese. Among Chinese, there are also different dialogues and subcultures. CLCA is striving to bring professional breastfeeding knowledge to Chinese people in different regions, and in a way that fits their specific subcultures. It is a work with great challenges, but, at the same time, great rewards.

台灣的醫療照護系統多是有醫護背景的人,而泌乳顧問還未被承認是照護團隊的一員。這是華人泌乳顧問協會的任務之一,讓國際認證泌乳顧問IBCLCs在公家或私人醫療機關都被認定是泌乳的專家。

再者,在華人文化中有很多對於哺乳或者泌乳的迷思及錯誤觀念,這對哺乳母親會造成困惑而導致無法繼續哺乳。華人泌乳顧問協會希望經由教育訓練課程、學術研討會議,不只是協助專業的國際認證泌乳顧問,也能幫助其他醫療工作人員及其他母乳泌乳相關人士有正確的知識能協助哺乳母親。在過程中,我們希望社會大眾認識 專業國際認證泌乳顧問的重要性。

現今華人在全球的人口將近14.3億;這是中國13.85億人口和海外華人約5千萬的總和。這佔全球人口約19.2%,也就是說每五個人中就有一個說中文的人。而在華人中,還有不同的方言與次文化。華人泌乳顧問協會致力於將正確及專業的母乳知識用適合其次文化的方式,帶給不同地區的華人。挑戰雖然大但是同對的獲得的也會很多。

First press conference, 12 December 2015

 

LM: Why did your organization decide to become an ILCA National—Regional Partner?

為什麼你的組織決定要成為本協會的合作夥伴?

(SFW): ILCA is the international organization for IBCLCs.

The members of CLCA currently include people from many Chinese-speaking countries, such as Taiwan, China, Hong Kong, Macao, Singapore, and Canada. CLCA serves to bridge the gap between Chinese-speaking countries and the rest of the world. Through translation, breastfeeding- and lactation-related knowledge and experiences can be exchanged via publication, media, conferences, and seminars. CLCA aims to impact Chinese globally. We wish to share with the world the breastfeeding experiences that are unique to the Chinese culture; for example, the postpartum “doing the month” practice. Through partnership with ILCA, we hope to share our experiences, and, in return, embrace the differences in breastfeeding from other cultures. Additionally, CLCA wishes to contribute to ILCA’s core value of diversity.

ILCA是國際認證泌乳顧問相關的國際組織。

華人泌乳顧問協會的成員如今已有各個說中文的國家,包括台灣、中國、香港、澳門、新加坡及加拿大。

華人泌乳顧問協會要成為華人與世界的橋樑。透過中英翻譯,母乳哺育與泌乳的知識與經驗可以經由文獻、網路及媒體、研討及學術會議達成更完整的交流。華人泌乳顧問協會的目標是影響全球的華人。我們希望能跟世界分享華人文化特色的母乳哺育經驗,尤其是產後坐月子習俗。而與ILCA合作,我們希望能世界分享華人的哺乳經驗,也經由接觸其他文化的哺乳經驗來豐富自己。最後,CLCA的加入希望能對ILCA多元性的核心價值做出貢獻。

 

LM: What is your vision for breastfeeding support in Taiwan and ethnic Chinese regions?

你們對在台灣及華人地區促進母乳哺育的願景是?

(SFW): CLCA aims to impact the health of Chinese-speaking society through breastfeeding and skilled lactation care.  CLCA supports breastfeeding and lactation by providing human resources, consultations, and exchanges of lactation care skills, which are specifically tailored to Chinese culture.

Screening of MILK in Taiwan, 13 November 2016

The goals of CLCA include:

  1. Practicing code and research: Developing research and evidence-based practices for lactation consultants.
  2. Promotion of IBCLCs and ethics regulations: Following the ethics regulations of the International Board of Lactation Consultant Examiners® (IBLCE®), CLCA has established professional conduct codes for lactation consultants, such as the charging standards. We promote equality and develop monitoring strategies among lactation consultants.
  3. Creating classification and qualification systems: Holding regular training courses and offering continuing education opportunities for Chinese lactation consultants. We aim to provide research evidence and clinical experience to improve the knowledge and skills of Chinese lactation consultants. The qualification committee manages the certification and re-certification process, and updates the list of qualified Chinese lactation consultants regularly.
  4. Collaboration and building of networks and advocates: Establishing a platform for human resources, marketing the professionalism of IBCLCs, collaborating with related professions through advocacy and codes, working to maximize the influence of IBCLCs in society.
  5. Promoting education and community supports: Following the International Code of Marketing Breast-milk Substitutes and subsequent resolutions of the WHO to provide the public and medical professions the latest lactation evidence-based knowledge through establishment of support groups among breastfeeding mothers and parentyoung child seminars for communities.

華人泌乳顧問協會的目標是經由母乳支持跟相關泌乳知識與技術傳承來服務全球廣大的華人。本會旨在營造一個能提供符合華人文化、特點的人力資源、專業諮詢、技術交流的母乳哺育專業團體。本會願景包括:

  1. 執業準則與實證研究:發展科學技術研究平台,建立實證為基礎的泌乳顧問執業標準。
  1. 執業促進與倫理規範:在泌乳顧問國際認證委員會(IBLCE)的倫理與紀律規範下,建立華人泌乳顧問運營規範,設置執業倫理規範與收費標準;推動同業公平發展監督機制。
  1. 能力分級與進階制度:辦理華人泌乳顧問培訓及進階繼續教育,根基研究成果和實務經驗,進行華人泌乳顧問專業能力進階與分級制度;設置審查委員會,進行資格認證和複審,定期審核並公佈認證華人泌乳專業人員名單。
  1. 合作網絡建置與推廣:建構人力資源平台,行銷並建立泌乳顧問專業形象,促進與規範與相關行業合作機制,擴大組織外部資源,以提升社會影響力。
  1. 推廣教育與社區支持:遵從母乳代用品之國際銷售守則,對公眾及醫療專業同僚提供最新泌乳實證知識;建立母乳媽媽互助機制,辦理社區親職講座並避免利益衝突。

 

Dr. Shu-Fang Wang, PhD, RN, CNM, IBCLC, CBD is the president and a founder of the Chinese Lactation Consultant Association (CLCA), a mother of three children, and a breastfeeding mother of almost 60 months. She has a PhD in Nursing from Kaohsiung Medical University, Taiwan, and two Master degrees: one in Nursing from Liverpool University, Great Britain; and another in Midwifery from National Taipei University of Nursing and Health Sciences, Taiwan. She is currently a nurse midwife at Tzu Chi Hospital, and an associate professor at Tzu Chi University.  She became an IBCLC in 2007 and is one of the first six IBCLCs in Taiwan. She is the first and only non-physician to open an independent clinic for lactation consultation in Taiwan, which is in still in operation now.

王淑芳博士是華人泌乳顧問協會創會理事長,三個孩子的母親,母乳哺育孩子的總時間近60個月。台灣高學醫學大學護理學院博士,現任職於慈濟醫院護理助產師,及慈濟大學兼任副教授。於2007年取得IBCLC資格,2008年一月起,台灣區首位以IBCLC身分於醫院開設母乳哺育諮詢特別門診迄今地的護理人員。

Members Scholarship Application Process OPEN!

 

ILCA is pleased to open the application process for ILCA Membership Scholarships. These scholarships are available to individuals who are unable to pay for ILCA membership due to social, economic, or political hardships. Scholarship funds are generously provided by our members through the ILCA Breastfeeding Benefactor Program.

Please click HERE to access the application if you would like to request an ILCA Membership Scholarship.

Member Scholarships granted will be for the 2017 calendar year 1 January 2017 through 31 December.

First deadline for application review: 31 December 2016.

Notification for applications received by first deadline: 31 January 2017.

Applications received after the first deadline will be reviewed as they are submitted until all available ILCA Member Scholarship funds are dispensed.

While ILCA would like to extend a scholarship to all applicants, funds are limited. Potential recipients are encouraged to apply as soon as possible. Member benefits will be available to scholarship recipients until 31 December 2017.

 

If you have any questions regarding this application or Membership Scholarships, email us at admin@ilca.org.