Lactation Matters

2017 ILCA Board of Directors Results

The International Lactation Consultant Association (ILCA) Board of Directors is pleased to announce that Sabeen AdilIona Macnab, and Nor Kamariah Mohamad Alwi have been elected by the ILCA membership to the Board of Directors.

Their three-year terms will commence July 2017. We look forward to working with them to continue ILCA’s mission: to advance the International Board Certified Lactation Consultant® (IBCLC®) profession worldwide through leadership, advocacy, professional development, and research.

Sabeen Adil, MD, IBCLC; Lagos, Lagos State, Nigeria

Sabeen Adil, MD, IBCLC currently lives in Lagos, Lagos State, Nigeria and is originally from Islamabad, Islamabad Capital Territory, Pakistan. She has experience working in lactation, pediatric, and maternity clinics and hospitals in United Arab Emirates (UAE), Pakistan, and Nigeria. Sabeen established the first lactation clinic in Pakistan, and worked to achieve recognition of lactation consultants as medical professionals in that country. She is currently a private practice lactation consultant in Nigeria.

 

 

Nor Kamariah Mohamad Alwi, BE, MIT, IBCLC; Bandar Baru Bangi, Selangor, Malaysia

Nor Kamariah Mohamad Alwi, BE, MIT, IBCLC resides in Bandar Baru Bangi, Selangor, Malaysia. She created the online breastfeeding support forum susuibu.com in 2004 and is a co-founder and President of Malaysian Breastfeeding Peer Counselors. She is on the Local Governance Task Force Coordinator for World Alliance for Breastfeeding Action (WABA). Nor is working with IBCLCs to establish a Malaysian Lactation Consultant Association. She is currently a private practice lactation consultant.

 

 

 

Iona Macnab, BA(Hons), LLB, IBCLC; Melbourne, Victoria, Australia

Iona Macnab, BA(Hons), LLB, IBCLC lives in Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. She is the co-founder of iLactation Online Breastfeeding Conferences, a global education platform offering continuing education credits for health professionals.  She was a Le Leche League (LLL) Leader in Japan (13 years) and Australia (6 years), as well as the LLL Regional Administrator for Asia, Africa and Middle East (7 years). Currently, Iona is the Conference Coordinator for Lactation Consultants for Australia and New Zealand (LCANZ) and ILCA’s Professional Development Committee Chair, in addition to her responsibilities with iLactation.

 

 

We are proud to have these lactation professionals join the ILCA Board of Directors.

The ILCA Board would like to thank each of you for your continued support. To find out more, please visit our website at www.ilca.org.

New! Advocacy Track at #ILCA17

Lactation specialists around the world are engaged in the critical work of protecting, promoting, and supporting lactation. Whether you engage in advocacy at the local, national, or international level, ILCA’s Advocacy Track offers sessions that will help you be an effective change agent.

New this year, the goals and objectives of the annual Global Partner Meeting have been woven into the Advocacy Track. This track (which offers continuing education credits) includes plenaries and breakout sessions and is designed to connect you to the people and ideas that you need in your changemaker toolbox.

One highlight of this new track is the 2017 Global Partners Panel:

Furthering the Global Breastfeeding Agenda through Local, National, Regional, and International Advocacy*

Speakers:

Arun Gupta of the Breastfeeding Promotion Network of India

Zoe Faulkner of the Lactation Consultants of Great Britain

Jennifer Welch of the Association Québécoise des consultantes en lactation diplômées de l’IBLCE.

Date: Friday, 21 July
Time: 1:45-2:45 pm, EST
Credit: 1 CEU

All conference attendees are welcome to join the conversation, whether or not you are following the Advocacy Track!

The ILCA Global Partners Program is improving breastfeeding outcomes by bringing together emerging local and national groups with established international organizations. Together, these groups are working to link goals, break down barriers, and pursue common objectives.

To join the Advocacy Track, click here to register for #ILCA17. There is no need to specifically register for the Advocacy Track.

*The Global Partners Panel is also a part of the #ILCA17 Virtual Conference.

LAST DAY for #ILCA17 Early Bird Registration!

Take advantage of Early Bird registration for the 2017 ILCA Annual Conference, Knowledge, Diversity, Equity: Global Access to Skilled Lactation Care, 19–22 July, in Toronto, Canada and save up to $125 on conference registration fees!

Early bird registration for #ILCA17 ends today at 11:59PM, EST, so REGISTER NOW!

Join us in TORONTO, CANADA to:

  • Learn from the leading experts around the globe—68 speakers representing 13 countries, our most diverse group of speakers yet. Earn up to 24 CEUs (including preconference sessions).
  • Get the clinical skills you need, from clinical skills rotations (preconference) to sessions on topics like donor milk, latch, tongue tie, and more.
  • Connect with the advocates improving lactation outcomes worldwide, and build your changemaker skills to take back to your community on our new advocacy track.
  • Enjoy formal and informal networking at the exhibit hall, network sessions, meals, and more.
Today is your LAST CHANCE to register for early bird pricing. Register now!

2017 ILCA Elections: Board of Directors

The ILCA Board of Directors has presented a ballot for ILCA voting members to select their next Directors.

All ILCA members who are certified as an IBCLC and are in good standing should have received an email from ILCA on 20 April 2017 containing a link to the ballot. If you did not receive an email and you should have, please contact the ILCA Office at info@ilca.org (or) 1+ 919-861-5577 (or) 888-452-2478. Our ILCA staff is eager to make sure you get a ballot, so your vote can be counted. To ensure a timely and secure election, all voting will take place through an online survey.

Prior to casting a vote, all voting ILCA members are encouraged to thoughtfully consider all information provided below. This will enable you to make an informed decision. Vote carefully: Once your vote is cast, it cannot be changed, repeated, or cancelled.

The balloting commences 20 April 2017 and concludes 12 May 2017, at which time all electronic votes will be tallied by the ILCA staff.

Board of Director Elections On behalf of the Board of Directors, we are pleased to present the 2017 ballot for election of Directors.  The Nominations Task force used an objective scoring system to conduct a fair and impartial assessment of each application. After thorough review and analysis, the following candidates were approved by the ILCA Board of Directors.  This year, we will be electing three new directors.

A Director must be elected by a majority of ILCA voting members. (Note: ILCA Bylaw 3.4 confers voting privileges to those dues-paying ILCA members who are also IBCLC certificants.)

The ILCA Board of Directors, in its November 2014 Lactation Matters blog, described three goals as part of its vision of, “World health transformed through breastfeeding and skilled lactation care:”

  1. Establish collaborative partnerships with other regional, national, and international organizations;
  2. Mentor newly developing organizations, worldwide, that promote IBCLC professional development and care;
  3. Build an ILCA infrastructure of equity and diversity, by reducing barriers of entry into the profession and into ILCA leadership positions. 

Accordingly, candidates to run for the position of ILCA Director, ideally, would:

  1. Embrace this strategic vision,
  2. Bring geographic diversity, especially from outside the USA
  3. Be alert to regional and cross-cultural differences as the occur within the global breastfeeding community
  4. Be sensitized to the challenges of ensuring equitable access to positions of leadership within ILCA for currently underrepresented social groups
Please take time to review the profiles of each nominee, by clicking on their names, prior to casting your vote. You will vote for three.

Sabeen Adil, MD, IBCLC, Lagos, Lagos State, Nigeria
Amal El-Taweel, MD, PhD, IBCLC, Giza, Giza Governorate, Egypt
Iona Macnab, BA(Hons), LLB, IBCLC, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
Nor Kamariah Mohamad Alwi, BE, MIT, IBCLC, Bandar Baru Bangi, Selangor, Malaysia

The ILCA Board extends a special thanks to the Nominations Committee for their efforts on behalf of the entire membership.

Board of Director Ratifications In addtion to our slate of nominees, the ILCA Board of Directors ask that you ratify the following Board members for a second term:

Kathleen Marinelli, MD, IBCLC, FABM, South Glastonbury, Connecticut, United States Lisa Akers, MS, RDN, IBCLC, RLC, FAND, Harrisonburg, Virginia, United States

Please note that the Board of Directors announced openings for positions of Secretary, Treasurer, and one Director position. No qualified applications were received for the Treasurer position; current board member Lisa Akers has offered to serve this role for her second term.  The Board has recommended she continue a second term in the Treasurer position. The one application received for the Secretary position did not meet all of the qualifications desired by the Board, therefore current board member Geraldine Cahill has offered to serve in the Secretary role temporarily, and the Board recommended to accept her service. Thus, this election will select three Directors.

Questions? Comments? Share them here! We want to hear from you.

#ILCA17 Virtual Conference Registration Now Open

Join the International Lactation Consultant Association (ILCA) for the #ILCA17 Virtual Conference!

Our all-new format goes far beyond live streaming to bring you the clinical skills you need, connect you with the #ILCA17 community, and build your changemaker toolbox.

LEARNING: More than DOUBLE the continuing education of previous live streaming. Final number of continuing education units TBA. 

CONNECTION: BUILD RELATIONSHIPS with the entire #ILCA17 community and join our Online CONNECT Community, exclusively for conference attendees. Chat with both face-to-face and virtual participants, get your questions answered by participating speakers, and find and share resources on the topics discussed at the conference.

BUILD THE SESSIONS YOU NEED: In addition to the scheduled sessions, #ILCA17 virtual attendees get FREE additional continuing education. Choose the content YOU need most by adding one additional credit from our on-demand learning in the Knowledge Center.

LIVE or ON YOUR TIME: Participate LIVE or watch on YOUR time – 90 full days of ACCESS to your content.

EASY TO USE + HELP WHEN YOU NEED IT: New to virtual conferences? We are here to help! EASY-TO-USE conference platform with dedicated, friendly, and patient tech support. During the live sessions, our professional tech support is supported by skilled moderators. We love bringing your online questions to the floor of #ILCA17!

For more information about the #ILCA17 online conference, a full schedule of events, and registration information, visit the virtual conference webpage!

 

JHL Call for Papers: Lactation and Social Justice

The Journal of Human Lactation (JHL) invites lactation-related research, reports, reviews, commentaries, and insights into practice and policy related to the theme of Lactation and Social Justice for an upcoming special issue. Click here to view JHL‘s new author submission guidelines.

Increasingly, breastfeeding is being viewed through a social justice lens, which approaches lactation as a human rights issue. The current unequal distribution of lactation services worldwide perpetuates breastfeeding inequities, along with significant reductions in human health due to lack of adequate lactation assistance.

From the social justice perspective, lactation support and services are a routine and required part of care for all families, including those who work, refugees, people who are incarcerated, transgender parents, and all who choose to breastfeed, chestfeed, or provide expressed human milk for their infants or young children.

For this issue of JHL, we are seeking manuscripts that address these and all social justice issues within the field of lactation. Manuscripts focusing on the local, regional, or global level are welcome. We are looking for an array of multidisciplinary approaches from many perspectives, including program planning, interventions, and policy. We are seeking research manuscripts, as well as Insights into Practice, Insights into Policy, and commentaries.

The submission deadline for the special issue is 1 December 2017.

Click HERE to submit your manuscript online. Journal of Human Lactation (JHL) is the top-ranked breastfeeding journal and the most valued benefit of ILCA membership. It is a quarterly, peer-reviewed journal publishing original research, insights in practice and policy, commentaries, and case reports relating to research and practice in human lactation and breastfeeding. JHL is relevant to lactation professionals in clinical practice, public health, research, and a broad range of fields related to the trans-disciplinary field of human lactation.

Lactation Professionals and Gender-Inclusive Language

Join us for the 2017 ILCA Conference and Annual Meeting, Knowledge, Diversity, Equity: Global Access to Skilled Lactation Care, 19-22 July in Toronto, Canada. #ILCA17 offers opportunities to learn from leading experts around the globe (68 speakers representing 13 countries) on a wide range of topics. Alice Farrow, IBCLC (Italy) is one of the #ILCA17 plenary speakers, and will be presenting Gender Diversity, Language, and Inclusion for Lactation Specialists.We spoke with Alice about the role of gender-inclusive language in providing compassionate, accessible lactation support, to get a feel for what we can look forward to at #ILCA17.

Lactation Matters (LM): How can knowledge of inclusive language help International Board Certified Lactation Consultants® (IBCLCs®) improve their practice?

Alice Farrow (AF): First, non-inclusive language is a barrier to practice.

Inclusive language can refer to many issues. My talk at the ILCA conference is about gender-inclusive language. Gender-inclusive language has become commonplace when it concerns changing male-gendered language to language that is inclusive of women. It used to be commonplace for the word “man” to mean men and women, or all people. It is no longer commonplace.

When I talk about gender-inclusive language, I am not referring to language that is inclusive of men and women. I am talking about all genders: cisgender and transgender, third gender, non-binary, agender, androgynous, gender queer, etc.

In lactation, pregnancy, and birth, until recently, language was unquestioningly female gendered and heteronormative, e.g. mothers give birth to babies and fathers support the dyad. But, not all families are composed of a mother and a father and their baby. It is now widely recognized that transgender men give birth; non-binary and agender people give birth; intersex people give birth; some men become primary caregivers without giving birth; some supporting partners are women; sometimes parents are the same sex; etc.

Mother + father + baby is no longer a formula that is inclusive of diverse family structures.

Misgendering people —for example referring to a birth father as “mum” or “mom” or referring to a female partner as “dad”—is erasing, hurtful, and disrespectful. A care provider is not doing a good job if their client or patient is uncomfortable, unable to listen to them, does not trust them, is afraid of them, is not intending to return for follow-up, is triggered, or is in any way damaged by the consultation or visit.

Transgender and gender nonconforming people have higher rates of suicide and mental illness and lower rates of health than the general population (not due to their gender, but due to society’s prejudice). This is a serious health equity issue. Knowledge of gender-inclusive language and a willingness to adopt gender-inclusive language will improve access to your care and improve the quality and appropriateness of the care you provide.

LM: What challenges do lactation consultants experience while working toward gender-inclusive language?

AF: This is very unique to the individual. Some IBCLCs do not find it particularly challenging to incorporate gender-inclusive language into their practice. I know of many IBCLCs who have updated their websites with gender-inclusive language. It may be more of an issue in unrehearsed speech.

There are some people who are strongly opposed to gender-inclusive language. I fully expect to be criticized for my talk at #ILCA17, and I am glad to be in a position to stand up and speak where other LGBTQI colleagues are perhaps not in a position where they feel safe doing so.

Some people are challenged by gender-inclusive language due to their religious beliefs, their upbringing, their ideologies, or something else. Some people were loudly outraged when the British Medical Association’s 2016 guide to inclusive language in the workplace suggested “pregnant people” in place of “expectant mothers” as inclusive of transgender men and intersex men. Some people see this as an erasure of women, but rather than proposing something that is inclusive of birthing women, men, non-binary, and transgender people, they want to maintain the current exclusive language. That is not okay. Exclusive language is not acceptable.

LM: Can you share with us one tip for introducing gender-inclusive language that you plan to share in your talk?

AF: Yes, quite simply adhere to the principle of treating your clients (and colleagues) with compassion, dignity, and respect.Change your intake forms to allow more than two genders, and ask preferred terms for parent/carer/family roles (i.e., mom/mum, dad, something else). Ask which pronouns the person uses (e.g., him, her, they, zie). Use the terms identified by your client and apologize if you get it wrong. That would be a great first step.

 

Alice Farrow is an IBCLC®, writer, speaker, and infant-feeding and health-equity advocate. Based in Rome, Italy, they have spoken around the world on LGBTQI health inequities, gender diversity, gender-inclusive language, lactation support for infants born with a cleft lip and palate, and barriers to entry to the lactation profession (in particular, those experienced by non-US candidates).

Alice participated in the 2014 Lactation Summit and the 2016 Lactation Equity Action Committee (LEAC) Global Forum, and published the groundbreaking article Lactation Support and the LGBTQI Community as part of a Journal of Human Lactation special issue on Equity. They write for the Language of Inclusion blog and the Cleft Lip and Palate Breastfeeding website, run the online support network for LGBTQI health professionals and allies Embracing Diversity in Reproductive Health, Birth and Infant Feeding, and run the Want to be an IBCLC? support groups for aspiring lactation consultants.

Alice is currently an undergraduate student with the Open University (UK), completing a Bachelor of Science with a focus on public health and public health promotion.

Resources on Recent Coverage of Neonatal Hypernatremia

The International Lactation Consultant Association (ILCA) has been closely following recent media coverage of neonatal hypernatremia and the role of skilled lactation care providers. We express our deep sympathies to the family impacted in these stories.

ILCA affirms the important role that International Board Certified Lactation Consultants® (IBCLC®s) play as a part of the healthcare team. For those seeking resources on the issues raised, we are sharing the following resources.

Academy of Breastfeeding MedicineOf Goldilocks and Neonatal Hypernatremia

UNICEF UKHypernatremic Dehydration: Response to News Coverage

Baby-Friendly USA – Individualized Care in the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative

Academy of Breastfeeding MedicineClinical Protocol #3: Hospital Guidelines for the Use of Supplementary Feedings in the Healthy Term Breastfed Neonate, Revised 2009

International Lactation Consultant AssociationPosition Paper on the Role and Impact of the IBCLC

We will continue to update this list as additional resources are developed. Do you have a resource you would like to suggest? Please share it with us in the comments.

Women’s Economic Empowerment: The Case for Paid Parental Leave and Support for Breastfeeding

Every day, ILCA is working in public and behind the scenes to promote the role of breastfeeding in transforming world health. 

One critical arena for our work is the Commission on the Status of Women (CSW). The CSW is so important to our work because it is the “the principal global intergovernmental body exclusively dedicated to the promotion of gender equality and the empowerment of women.” 

Their role is to promote women’s rights around the globe. That is why we believe it is critical to elevate breastfeeding, and specifically, paid parental leave to support breastfeeding, at CSW.

The International Lactation Consultant Association  (ILCA) and the World Alliance for Breastfeeding Action (WABA) have released the following statement in support of the sixty-first session of the Commission on the Status of Women at the United Nations Headquarters in New York, USA 13-24 March 2017.

You can read the statement below. You can also find it on the ILCA website in our resources section for future reference.

Breastfeeding provides a strong foundation for the economic empowerment of families throughout the world. In addition to improving maternal and child health, supporting recommended breastfeeding practices could save annually an estimated $302 billion USD globally.

A robust body of evidence demonstrates that breastfeeding contributes to improved maternal and child health, across the life course. Optimal breastfeeding is associated with higher educational attainment and economic productivity of women and girls in adulthood.

A major gap in advancing women’s economic empowerment are policies and practices that also support women’s work as mothers and family caregivers. Perhaps the greatest gap can be found in the lack of adequate support for breastfeeding mothers and infants.

Therefore, the purpose of this statement is to make a case for women’s economic empowerment, specifically through paid parental leave in support of breastfeeding.

The Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action calls upon governments to ensure that legislation, incentives, and appropriate institutional support systems empower women and parents to balance breastfeeding with the demands of women’s labour.

Poverty is a barrier to optimal breastfeeding globally. The Commission on the Status of Women 2016 released a report revealed that among the estimated 43% of people living in severe poverty 70% are women, youth and children. Women and girls living in poverty carry a disproportionate burden of unpaid labour, which in turn leads to poverty across generations. Women in impoverished settings may spend up to 80 hours per week on family care, cooking, cleaning, wood and water fetching, which is the equivalent of two full time jobs. As a result impoverished girls and women are often unable to complete an education and find safe wage-based employment that may lead to improved economic standing for their families and communities. Women and children living in fragile settings are especially vulnerable to the poverty-generating impacts of climate change, forced migration, war, epidemics, and disasters. Suboptimal breastfeeding is also associated with decreased birth spacing, which is a risk factor of both perinatal morbidity and mortality and increased global population growth.

Today’s global economic and labour conditions are changing rapidly, and has led to improvements in women’s participation in local and global economies. However, the benefits of paid labour do not reach all women and families equally. Women continue to participate in labour markets on an unequal basis with men. In 2013, the male employment-to-population ratio stood at 72.2 per cent, while the ratio for females was 47.1 per cent. About 830 million women, mainly in low-income countries, lack social protection for oppressive working conditions. Women in these settings typically have access only to low-paying jobs with poor, and often violent, working conditions. Only 53% of countries meet the International Labour Organisation’s 14-week minimum standard for maternity leave. Together, these factors create insurmountable challenges to mothers breastfeeding as recommended by the World Health Organization and numerous maternal-child health organizations.

Several international conventions and instruments support global maternal- and parental- workplace and breastfeeding empowerment, including The Convention on Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women, the Convention on the Rights of the Child, the Innocenti Declaration on the Protection, Promotion and Support of Breastfeeding, the Global Strategy for Infant and Young Child Feeding and the International Labour Organisation Convention on Maternity Protection.

Women’s economic empowerment is inextricably linked to women’s empowerment as mothers and primary infant caregivers. The needed support includes, but is not limited to, actions that extend access to paid maternity or parental leave, paid breastfeeding breaks, and family friendly environments with flexible, baby-friendly working arrangements. It includes creating social support systems that value women, mothers, breastfeeding, and family care work. Such support systems will only be achieved by inclusion of all members of society, but particularly men, youth, grandparents, childcare providers, employers, and policy makers, in recognizing the importance of women’s economic and maternal empowerment. By creating opportunities for equitable parental and domestic responsibilities, new pathways emerge for building gender equality at the home, the workplace, and society.

When more women work, economies grow. When more mothers breastfeed as recommended, they are healthier, their children are healthier, and their children grow to have healthier children of their own. Healthy children are more likely to survive living in poverty, complete an education, find employment, help lift their families and communities out of poverty, and contribute to long-term national economic growth.

It is, therefore, urgent that breastfeeding advocates, together with women’s health, gender rights advocates, trade unionists, employers and governments, United Nations agencies and others seek collaborative ways to respond.

The World Alliance for Breastfeeding Action and the International Lactation Consultant Association believe that these actions to enhance paid parental leave and support for breastfeeding are essential to making women’s economic empowerment in the changing workforce.

Do you have questions about CSW, ILCA’s global agenda, or the role of paid parental leave on impacting breastfeeding? We want to hear from you! Please leave a comment.

Is Your Baby in Special Care? Best Tips from Lactation Professionals

“If my baby needs special care in the hospital, what do I need to know about breastfeeding?” Parents often approach lactation consultants with questions about breastfeeding/chestfeeding and babies with special needs.

To help celebrate #happyIBCLCday, we asked our members to share some tips and strategies with families.

“I would recommend spending as much time skin-to-skin with baby as long as both mom and babe are medically stable, start pumping/and or hand expressing colostrum within 6 hours of delivery, give any expressed colostrum to the baby, and allow baby to explore mom’s breasts and nipples as tolerated, even if baby is unable to suckle just yet. Give the baby a name and talk to him as much as possible.” -Jenna Gilbert, IBCLC

“That breastmilk is so important for babies with special needs and to continue breastfeeding with least separation from baby that is medically possible. Make sure you get in touch with an IBCLC® for support and start hand expression, as well as pumping, if separated for feeds and establishing your milk supply.” -Angie Hilliard, IBCLC

“The sooner you can contact a lactation consultant in this scenario, the better. The very basic thing all parents need to know—even if baby will not require special care—is the power of skin-to-skin and touch. Parents also need to remember “8 or more in 24” to remind themselves how many times they need to stimulate their breasts to build milk supply during this time.” -Tori LaChapelle Sproat, IBCLC

“Skin-to-skin [as soon as possible] and pumping or hand expression for mom within 6 hours of delivery, if not sooner. Get in touch with the lactation team [as soon as possible].” -Jill Stailey Benner, IBCLC

Find an IBCLC to help with your questions about lactation and employment or your other breastfeeding questions.

Find an IBCLC

What is an IBCLC?

An International Board Certified Lactation Consultant® (IBCLC) is a healthcare professional specializing in the clinical management of breastfeeding and lactation.

An IBCLC is an invaluable asset to breastfeeding families, reassuring you when lactation are going well, and by providing information and support to help prevent and manage common concerns. IBCLCs help with:

  • Prenatal counseling about the factors that may affect breastfeeding, chestfeeding, and lactation
  • Basic position and latch of the infant
  • Information about practices that promote successful lactation
  • Preventing and managing common concerns such as poor latch, inadequate milk transfer or supply, nipple or breast/chest pain, and calming a fussy baby
  • Milk expression and storage for parents who must be separated from their babies
  • Strategies for lactation after returning to work
  • Breastfeeding and lactation in challenging situations, such as feeding twins or triplets, a premature or sick infant, or infants in special medical situations.
Lactation consultants, do you have other tips to share? Families, do you have questions? Share them here!

 

Looking for other ways to celebrate IBCLC day? Click here for all of our #happyIBCLCday images and resources.

Breastfeeding and Employment: Best Tips from Lactation Professionals

“How can I make lactation work with my employment?” Breastfeeding (or chestfeeding) and work questions are some of the most common questions received here at Lactation Matters.

To help celebrate #happyIBCLCday, we asked our members to share some tips  and strategies with families.

“Talking to your employer prenatally is essential! I’ve found in working with parents in a variety of fields from military to office to restaurants that having this conversation while pregnant helps a lot! Give a proposed schedule to your employer and even discuss the business case for breastfeeding if they should have concerns. Some countries provide protections for working parents—that is worth looking up. Lastly, find a lactation consultant and talk about pumping logistics for while you’re at work, hands-on pumping, when to start collecting milk after having baby, and be sure you’re properly fitted for a pump!” – Tori LaChapelle Sproat, IBCLC

“Keep an eye on how many milk removals (breastfeeds plus pumps) you do in a day. Keeping that “Magic Number” steady after you go back to work should prevent a dip in milk production.” – Nancy Morbacher, IBCLC

“Avoid over-feeding when using a bottle, so that the parent can keep up with the baby’s needs when separated.” – Laura Spitzfaden, IBCLC

“If you have a healthy, term baby that is exclusively breastfed, you don’t need to wash pump parts after  every pumping session. The time saved by tossing the parts in a refrigerator and washing them once at the end of the day really adds up—sometimes it even provides enough time to squeeze in a short pumping session.” – Erica Charpentier, IBCLC

“The strategies that work for one type of job might not be ones that work in another industry. In the U.S., there are a number of tools designed both for parents and for local advocates to use to educate, strategize, and build the business case for breastfeeding. Check out this resource that shows common solutions by industry. And here’s a presentation you can use in your own community.” – Cathy Carothers, IBCLC

“Congratulations on your decision to provide your milk to your baby while you go back to work! Working and breastfeeding/chestfeeding parents really have two jobs, which can be particularly exhausting. It’s worth talking with your employer and with HR ahead of time to make a milk-expressing plan. [If you reside in the United States], The Business Case for Breastfeeding is an absolutely brilliant website you can share with your employer explaining how much money they will save by supporting you in pumping for your baby. If your employer has more than 50 employees, they are obligated to provide a private, non-bathroom space with a sink and fridge for you to pump. Explaining how this benefits their bottom line is essential. Your insurance company should provide you with a pump. If you can, attend a La Leche League meeting in your community or visit an online forum for advice on the best pumps for your situation, and to figure out a pumping schedule. If you do have the opportunity to meet with an IBCLC before your baby is born, or while you are on leave (if you have any leave!), she or he can help you plan for expressing your milk while at work, and breastfeeding when you are with your baby. Good luck!” – Betsy Hoffmeister, IBCLC

Find an IBCLC to help with your questions about lactation and employment or your other breastfeeding questions.

Find an IBCLC®

What is an IBCLC?

An International Board Certified Lactation Consultant® (IBCLC) is a healthcare professional specializing in the clinical management of breastfeeding and lactation.

An IBCLC® is an invaluable asset to breastfeeding families, reassuring you when lactation are going well, and by providing information and support to help prevent and manage common concerns. IBCLCs help with:

  • Prenatal counseling about the factors that may affect breastfeeding, chestfeeding, and lactation
  • Basic position and latch of the infant
  • Information about practices that promote successful lactation
  • Preventing and managing common concerns such as poor latch, inadequate milk transfer or supply, nipple or breast/chest pain, and calming a fussy baby
  • Milk expression and storage for parents who must be separated from their babies
  • Strategies for lactation after returning to work
  • Breastfeeding and lactation in challenging situations, such as feeding twins or triplets, a premature or sick infant, or infants in special medical situations.
Lactation consultants, do you have other tips to share? Families, do you have questions? Share them here!

 

Looking for other ways to celebrate IBCLC day? Click here for all of our #happyIBCLCday images and resources.

How Does Birth Impact How I Feed My Baby? Best Tips from Lactation Professionals

“Does our birth experience impact our breastfeeding?” Regardless of how your baby was born, lactation consultants can help you establish the breastfeeding relationship you want.

To help celebrate #happyIBCLCday, we asked our members to share some tips  and strategies with families.

“How you feel about your birth experience can impact your breastfeeding relationship. The method of birth can present some challenges (Caesarean stitches will need to be worked around) but these do not compare to a parent who has felt that they were a passenger in their own medical care. It can be hard to connect when you’re experiencing these emotions. The good news is that these do not make breastfeeding impossible! If you have questions, help exists. Your goals matter and you deserve to be heard—especially with your breastfeeding journey!” -Tori LaChapelle Sproat

“Absolutely! Our birth experience can have drastic implications on our breastfeeding journey. The most important thing is to advocate for your baby and yourself. Do you need access to a breast pump? Ask for one. Do skin-to-skin as much as possible. Ask for help if you need it or just aren’t sure if things are going well. I also feel it is important to talk about your experience. What happened during your delivery? Find someone you can talk to. Maybe even journal your experience. It is so important to work through the emotions surrounding the memories of our birth experiences, good or bad. Breastfeeding can help you heal if you didn’t get the birth you desired. It provides you and your baby with a beautiful bonding experience that simply cannot be replicated.” -Jennifer Passwaters, IBCLC

“As a midwife, I often get questions about the benefits of delayed cord clamping. The evidence tells us that allowing the cord to pulse naturally gives the baby iron stores that can offset the risk of iron deficiencies in infancy.” – Sarah Davis, LM, IBCLC

“Pretty much all babies are born to breastfeed, no matter how they choose to be born! In my area, all hospitals deposit babies directly onto the parent’s chest immediately after birth. This facilitates early breastfeeding and bonding, even after a c-section. I think it’s important to know that having lots of IV fluids can impact breastfeeding in a few ways.First, it can make babies “extra juicy.” Babies may be born at up to 6% heavier than their expected birth weight, which they lose really rapidly in their first 48 hours. It can look like they are losing a dangerous amount of weight! So it’s important to evaluate in the context of whether baby is eating, peeing, and pooping well. Second, extra IV fluids may cause extra swelling in the feet, legs, hands—and breasts! Swelling, or edema, can make nipples appear flat and can make breasts very hard and uncomfortable. A shortcut is to use a nipple shield, which can be very helpful. But, there are manual tricks for moving fluid out of the breast which is way better for the parent and baby in the long run.

I think it’s very helpful to know that a very prolonged labor can cause a delay in mature milk “coming in” by a day or two, and a c-section can also delay milk coming in by a day or two. In this case, consult with an IBCLC® on how to manage feeding the baby while waiting for the milk to come in. Keeping the baby wrapped next to your skin, with his bare face on your bare chest, as much as possible, may be the single most useful thing you can do to help your milk come in and help your baby learn to breastfeed. And most of all, ask for help from an IBCLC® in the hospital, from your midwife, or from a community-based IBCLC®!” – Betsy Hoffmeister, IBCLC

Find an IBCLC to help with your questions about lactation and employment or your other breastfeeding questions.

Find an IBCLC

What is an IBCLC?

An International Board Certified Lactation Consultant® (IBCLC) is a healthcare professional specializing in the clinical management of breastfeeding and lactation.

An IBCLC is an invaluable asset to breastfeeding families, reassuring you when lactation are going well, and by providing information and support to help prevent and manage common concerns. IBCLCs help with:

  • Prenatal counseling about the factors that may affect breastfeeding, chestfeeding, and lactation
  • Basic position and latch of the infant
  • Information about practices that promote successful lactation
  • Preventing and managing common concerns such as poor latch, inadequate milk transfer or supply, nipple or breast/chest pain, and calming a fussy baby
  • Milk expression and storage for parents who must be separated from their babies
  • Strategies for lactation after returning to work
  • Breastfeeding and lactation in challenging situations, such as feeding twins or triplets, a premature or sick infant, or infants in special medical situations.
Lactation consultants, do you have other tips to share? Families, do you have questions? Share them here!

 

Looking for other ways to celebrate IBCLC day? Click here for all of our #happyIBCLCday images and resources.

When Should Families Get Help From a Lactation Consultant?

 

“When should I consult with an IBCLC?” Knowing when to ask for assistance is a common question faced by breastfeeding/chestfeeding families.

To help celebrate #happyIBCLCday, we asked our members to share some tips  and strategies with families.

“If you perceive a problem and your corrective action isn’t making an improvement within 48 hours.” -Brenda Dalton, IBCLC

“Anytime you have a question or concern related to breastfeeding: before pregnancy, during pregnancy, anytime after baby is born, if you are considering surrogacy/adopting, you have friends or family members or co-workers who are breastfeeding. Even (especially) if you are a healthcare worker or involved in care of children and parents and want to be helpful, encouraging, and supportive.” -Phyllis Kombol, IBCLC

“Call us any time you have questions! . . . Google and Facebook groups can be helpful, but many times overwhelming. Call an IBCLC® with your questions – we love what we do and are happy to answer the call. If you’re needing more detailed advice (continuing pain, weight loss concerns, supply concerns) then please find an IBCLC® and be seen in person! [The] visit will save you hours of internet browsing and help empower you in your breastfeeding journey!” -Tori LaChapelle Sproat, IBCLC

“Most basic breastfeeding/chestfeeding questions can be answered by community support from [peer-to-peer lactation support groups] and [peer counselors] . . .It is wonderfully comforting to hire an IBCLC® even for simple challenges—because it’s so lovely to have a compassionate care provider sit with you and answer all your questions for a few hours! If your insurance covers it or if you have the resources, it’s definitely worth meeting with an IBCLC® prior to the birth of your baby for a breastfeeding class. It’s even a nice idea to hire an IBCLC® just to make sure everything is going well.” – Betsy Hoffmeister, IBCLC

Find an IBCLC to help with your questions about lactation and employment or your other breastfeeding questions.

Find an IBCLC

What is an IBCLC?

An International Board Certified Lactation Consultant® (IBCLC) is a healthcare professional specializing in the clinical management of breastfeeding and lactation.

An IBCLC is an invaluable asset to breastfeeding families, reassuring you when lactation are going well, and by providing information and support to help prevent and manage common concerns. IBCLCs help with:

  • Prenatal counseling about the factors that may affect breastfeeding, chestfeeding, and lactation
  • Basic position and latch of the infant
  • Information about practices that promote successful lactation
  • Preventing and managing common concerns such as poor latch, inadequate milk transfer or supply, nipple or breast/chest pain, and calming a fussy baby
  • Milk expression and storage for parents who must be separated from their babies
  • Strategies for lactation after returning to work
  • Breastfeeding and lactation in challenging situations, such as feeding twins or triplets, a premature or sick infant, or infants in special medical situations.
Lactation consultants, do you have other tips to share? Families, do you have questions? Share them here!

 

Looking for other ways to celebrate IBCLC day? Click here for all of our #happyIBCLCday images and resources.

Preparing to Breastfeed: Best Tips from Lactation Professionals

“How should I prepare for breastfeeding before my baby arrives?” Helping families get ready for breastfeeding/chestfeeding is a common role for lactation consultants.

To help celebrate #happyIBCLCday, we asked our members to share some tips  and strategies with families.

“ . . . Go and see and be around other nursing mothers, make connections with other families and support people during pregnancy. . .Talk to your partner about what breastfeeding means to you and what you think might be helpful from them (and not). Often the partner (if one is involved) says or does things that hurt the breastfeeding person without realizing it. In my class, we practice how the partner can share and show love and concern by asking what the mom needs in that moment (vs. giving advice or dismissive comments).” -Roxanna Farnsworth, IBCLC

“Ask about your hospital or birth center’s policy on skin-to-skin and the . . .  hours [immediately] after birth. Plan for uninterrupted skin-to-skin and breastfeeding for a minimum of 1-2 hours or longer if needed. Prepare your family that you will be limiting visitors during this time.” -Chasta Carson Hite, IBCLC

“My advice? Take a prenatal breastfeeding class, and set up a prenatal education consult with an IBCLC if you can. Learn & practice hand expression, so you can get good at it by the time you need it- it is really beneficial!” -Bryna Sampey, IBCLC

“Watch others breastfeed, ask lots of questions.” -Claire Clark, IBCLC

“Focus on learning about what normal newborn breastfeeding behaviors are! They are very different from that beautiful 5-month-old you may have seen breastfeeding . . .” -Lynette Beard, IBCLC

“Surround yourself with support (find your village) and join [a peer-to-peer breastfeeding support group].” -Maria Ryan, IBCLC

“Do your homework, join [a peer-to-peer lactation support group] and make contact with your local group. Mothering is jolly hard work . . . not the breastfeeding! The first 6 weeks are the hardest. There is heaps of help and support out there. Know where it is.” -Ellen Prendergast, IBCLC

“Determination is key and having a positive influence for support on your journey. [Take a] breastfeeding prenatal class prior to delivery. [Contact] a lactation consultant in hospital when needed. Having contact information of a lactation consultant and breastfeeding support in your community to support your personal breastfeeding goals so that you can have your best experience possible!” -Angie Hilliard, IBCLC

Find an IBCLC to help with your questions about lactation and employment or your other breastfeeding questions.

Find an IBCLC

What is an IBCLC?

An International Board Certified Lactation Consultant® (IBCLC) is a healthcare professional specializing in the clinical management of breastfeeding and lactation.

An IBCLC® is an invaluable asset to breastfeeding families, reassuring you when lactation are going well, and by providing information and support to help prevent and manage common concerns. IBCLCs help with:

  • Prenatal counseling about the factors that may affect breastfeeding, chestfeeding, and lactation
  • Basic position and latch of the infant
  • Information about practices that promote successful lactation
  • Preventing and managing common concerns such as poor latch, inadequate milk transfer or supply, nipple or breast/chest pain, and calming a fussy baby
  • Milk expression and storage for parents who must be separated from their babies
  • Strategies for lactation after returning to work
  • Breastfeeding and lactation in challenging situations, such as feeding twins or triplets, a premature or sick infant, or infants in special medical situations.
Lactation consultants, do you have other tips to share? Families, do you have questions? Share them here!

 

Looking for other ways to celebrate IBCLC day? Click here for all of our #happyIBCLCday images and resources.

2017 JHL New Features: Lactation Newsmakers and About Research

Following a year of “listening and learning,” Journal of Human Lactation (JHL) Editor in Chief, Joan E. Dodgson, PhD, MPH, RN, FAAN has made new additions to JHL, with the goal of providing content that best meets the needs of the JHL’s reader community.

Two new feature columns, Lactation Newsmakers and About Research, will appear in each new issue of JHL.

The Lactation Newsmakers column will present interviews with individuals doing exemplary work worldwide, promoting and supporting breastfeeding. In addition to highlighting the wealth of knowledge and experience in the larger community of lactation professionals, JHL hopes this column will help stimulate new ideas and projects in local communities and/or agencies.

ILCA members can use their free JHL access to read the first interview, conducted by Dr. Kathleen Marinelli (JHL Associate Editor) with Dr. Cesar Victoro of Brazil, a global leader in promoting and protecting breastfeeding in ways that affect clinical practice daily.

The About Research column was added in direct response to needs expressed by the JHL reader community, many of whom are not researchers. The feature is designed to foster greater understanding of the specific types of research published in the journal. It will highlight the diversity of research methods in the field of lactation research and its various disciplines, while providing information about how to determine scientific rigor and quality in the research process, written specifically to address the needs of non-researchers.

For example, the February edition of JHL features four literature reviews, each with slightly different methodologies. The About Research column “focuses on various types of literature reviews and what constitutes rigor and quality in each,” as described by Dodgson in her editorial What’s New This Year? ILCA members can access this editorial, the literature reviews and the About Research column HERE.

Have questions about how to access this or other ILCA members benefits? Click here to access all your benefits in one place, plus get your questions answered with FAQs and tech support.

Not an ILCA member? You can still access JHL by visiting the JHL homepage for article abstracts and subscription information.

2017 IBCLC Care Award Applications: Now Open

Let potential clients know that your Hospital-Based Facility or Community-Based Agency recognizes the role of the International Board Certified Lactation Consultant® (IBCLC®) in protecting, promoting, and supporting breastfeeding by applying for the IBCLC Care Award.

The IBCLC Care Awards are promoted  to new families and the general public, which means your facility can enjoy the benefits of positive public relations in your community, including:

  • Enhanced attractiveness to potential patients
  • Competitive edge in recruiting lactation consultants, nurses, midwives, mother support counselors, and other medical staff
  • General goodwill in the community by providing excellent care in helping new families reach their breastfeeding goals

Visit the IBCLC Care Directory to see which Hospital-Based Facilities are already benefiting from the IBCLC Care Award program!

Hospital-Based Facilities and Community-Based Health Agencies that staff currently certified IBCLCs can apply online to become a recognized IBCLC Care Award facility. Learn more about the qualifications, and complete the online application here.

Applications will be accepted through 17 February 2017.

The award was created by International Board of Lactation Consultant Examiners® (IBLCE®) and International Lactation Consultant Association® (ILCA®). Learn more and apply here.